Body Mass And Exercise

More Information on Body Mass Risk Assessment and Physical Activity

Key Recommendations (From the Expert Panel on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults)

Weight loss is advised to lower elevated blood pressure in overweight and obese persons with high blood pressure. Weight loss is also suggested to lower elevated levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides, and to raise low levels of HDL-cholesterol in overweight and obese persons with dyslipidemia. Weight loss is effective to lower elevated blood glucose levels in overweight and obese persons with type 2 diabetes.   Use the BMI to assess overweight and obesity. Body weight alone can be used to follow weight loss, and to determine the effectiveness of therapy. The BMI is used to classify excess weight and obesity and to estimate relative risk of disease compared to normal weight. The waist circumference should be used to assess abdominal fat content. The initial goal of weight loss therapy should be to reduce body weight by about 10 percent from the baseline. With success, and if warranted, further weight loss can be attempted. Weight loss should be gradual and around 1 to 2 pounds per week for a period of 6 months, with subsequent strategy based on the amount of weight lost. Low calorie diets (LCD) are used for weight loss in overweight and obese persons. Reducing fat as part of an LCD is a practical way to reduce calories. Reducing dietary fat alone without reducing calories is not sufficient for weight loss. However, reducing dietary fat, and with reducing dietary carbohydrates, can help reduce calories. A diet that is individually planned to help create a deficit of 500 to 1,000 kcal/day should be an intregal part of any program aimed at achieving a weight loss of 1 to 2 pounds per week.   Physical activity should be part of a comprehensive weight loss therapy and weight control program because it: (1) modestly contributes to weight loss in overweight and obese adults, (2) may decrease abdominal fat, (3) increases cardiorespiratory fitness, and (4) may help with maintenance of weight loss. Physical activity should be an integral part of weight loss therapy and weight maintenance. Initially, moderate levels of physical activity for 30 to 45 minutes, 3 to 5 days a week, should be encouraged. All adults should set a long-term goal to accumulate at least 30 minutes or more of moderate-intensity physical activity on most, and preferably all, days of the week. The combination of a reduced calorie diet and increased physical activity is recommended since it produces weight loss that may also result in decreases in abdominal fat and increases in cardiorespiratory fitness. Behavior therapy is a useful adjunct when incorporated into treatment for weight loss and weight maintenance. Weight loss and weight maintenance therapy should employ the combination of LCD’s, increased physical activity, and behavior therapy. After successful weight loss, the likelihood of weight loss maintenance is enhanced by a program consisting of dietary therapy, physical activity, and behavior therapy and this should be continued. Drug therapy can also be used with a Doctor’s guidance. However, drug safety and efficacy beyond 1 year of total treatment have not been established. A weight maintenance program should be a priority after the initial 6 months of weight loss therapy.

Part 1: Assessing Your Risk

According to the NHLBI guidelines, assessment of excess weight involves using three key measures:

  • body mass index (BMI)
  • waist circumference, and
  • risk factors for diseases and conditions associated with obesity.

The BMI is a measure of your weight relative to your height and waist circumference measures abdominal fat. Combining these with information about your additional risk factors yields your risk for developing obesity-associated diseases.

What is Your Risk?

1.  Body Mass Index (BMI)

BMI is a reliable indicator of total body fat, which is related to the risk of disease and death. The score is valid for both men and women but it does have some limits. The limits are:

  • It may overestimate body fat in athletes and others who have a muscular build.
  • It may underestimate body fat in older persons and others who have lost muscle mass.

Use the BMI calculator <http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/bmicalc.htm> or tables to estimate your total body fat. The BMI score in the following shows how to rate the weight status.

FOR South Asian Normal BMI is <23

BMI

Underweight

Below 18.5

Normal

18.5 – 24.9

Overweight

25.0 – 29.9

Obesity

30.0 – 30.9

Morbid Obesity

40 & above

 

2.   Waist Circumference

Determine your waist circumference by placing a measuring tape snugly around your waist. It is a good indicator of your abdominal fat (another predictor of your risk for developing risk factors for heart disease and other diseases). This risk increases with a waist measurement of over 40 inches in men and over 35 inches in women

3.   Other Risk Factors

Besides being overweight or obese, there are additional risk factors to consider.

Risk Factors

High blood pressure (hypertension), high LDL-cholesterol (“bad” cholesterol) low HDL-cholesterol (“good” cholesterol), high triglycerides, high blood glucose, (sugar) family history of premature heart disease, physical inactivity and cigarette smoking.

4.   Assessment

For people who are considered obese (BMI greater than or equal to 30) or those who are overweight (BMI of 25 to 29.9) and have two or more risk factors, the guidelines recommend weight loss. Even a small weight loss (just 10 percent of your current weight) will help to lower your risk of developing diseases associated with obesity. Patients who are overweight, but do not have a high waist measurement, and have less than 2 risk factors may need to prevent further weight gain rather than lose weight.

Talk to your doctor to see if you are at an increased risk and if you should lose weight. Your doctor will evaluate your BMI, waist measurement, and other risk factor for heart disease. People who are overweight or obese have a greater chance of developing high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol or other lipid disorders, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and certain cancers. Even a small weight loss (just 10 percent less than current weight) will help to lower the risk of developing those diseases.